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Thursday, 30 April 2015

Join in the Waverley Instagram Photo A Day Challenge! #MayIsSewingMonth


 



Hello, Sarah from Marketing here. A few weeks ago I received an email from Janine, the Neighbourhood Coordinator of the Waverley group in Victoria. Waverley were interested in using Instagram to share their love of sewing and to celebrate National Sewing Month. I was excited, really excited! I just love Instagram, it’s a wonderful way to share photos and a great source of sewing inspiration. If you are not familiar with Instagram, here’s the scoop…..

Instagram is an online mobile (iPhone or Android) photo-sharing, video-sharing and social networking service that enables its users to take pictures and videos, and share them on a variety of social networking platforms. A distinctive feature is that it confines photos to a square shape, similar to Kodak Instamatic and Polaroid images. Users can also apply digital filters to their images. The maximum duration for Instagram videos is 15 seconds.

Instagram uses hashtags, a type of label or metadata tag used on social network and microblogging services which makes it easier for users to find messages with a specific theme or content. Users create and use hashtags by placing the hash character (or number sign) # in front of a word or unspaced phrase, either in the main text of a message or at the end. Searching for that hashtag will then present each message that has been tagged with it.

If that got you interested, this beginner’s guide to Instagram will get you Instagramming in mere minutes!


How do I get involved?

You can post any sewing related images on Instagram and use both the hashtags #MayIsSewingMonth & #ASGmember or you can join in the Photo A Day challenge. Each day of May has a suggested topic (prompt), as shown in the pictures here. Snap a pic related to the prompt & post it to Instagram. In the caption you can put ‘Day 1. May Sewing Plans #MayIsSewingMonth & #ASGmember’. Simple!

You can participate in the Photo A Day Challenge every day or only the days you feel like it. You can post several days at the one time. Do what works for you! Even non ASG members can participate, just leave off the hashtag #ASGmember. To help you get the perfect pic, check out this photo guide, it even has some info on collaging images together.

I am so excited to see your amazing photos and get into your sewing spaces! I think this is such a great way to share across the country. Thank you Waverley group, what a fantastic idea. You’ll be seeing my pics soon.








Wednesday, 29 April 2015

Refashion Tips: Converting trousers to a skirt



Last week we unveiled Castaway to Couture an an exciting, national refashioning competition, open to the public, ASG members & Red Cross people too! Castaway to Couture is brought to you by the Australian Sewing Guild Inc. in collaboration with Red Cross Shops. Entries open today, so we have our resident refashioning genie, Judith Turner here, with the ninth in a series of tips. Take it away Judith.........



Here’s a creative idea for you. Convert trousers to a skirt. Just a few steps and its all finished.

Unpick the inside leg seams. Lay the trousers out on your cutting table and pin two front panels together, then the two back panels. Stitch together using a large stitch that will easily be unpicked.

Try on. It might be helpful to have someone help you pin it to your body shape.

The only issue you may have is in the zip area. The lower half of the zip may need to be unpicked and taken in. This will depend on your body shape.

The trousers I did had two zips at the center back of each leg, so I left these in. The skirt will be a pencil skirt, unless it has a very flared leg. So having zips at the front or back will help with walking.

Here are some photos of the trousers I converted to a skirt.

Happy altering

Judith Turner  a.k.a genie

Keep an eye on this blog for more hints, tips and ideas! We want to keep you buzzing with ideas, so not only will you hear from Judith, we will have some inspirational blogs to check out. This week, we suggest checking out Recycled Fashion (Hi Erica!), Sew it Again and I love to Op Shop. Have a great week, we can't wait to see your entries!

Wednesday, 22 April 2015

Refashion Tips: Remodel turtle neck jumper


Last week we unveiled Castaway to Couture an an exciting, national refashioning competition, open to the public, ASG members & Red Cross people too! Castaway to Couture is brought to you by the Australian Sewing Guild Inc. in collaboration with Red Cross Shops. Entries open today, so we have our resident refashioning genie, Judith Turner here, with the eighth in a series of tips. Take it away Judith.........


This is something you might find in a Red Cross store. A turtle neck jumper. Some people love high necklines. Personally I prefer them a little lower. I had a top that a client had wanted shortened, and given I do not throw anything away that I think I might use one day, I thought this turtle neck jumper could do with a remodel.

I did unpick the hem on the animal print piece, so that it stayed as long as possible.

Work out how low you want the top. It is always better to put it on and place a safety pin at the finished length between the neck and bust area.

This garment had a separate ribbed section at the top. I cut this off first, then proceeded to work out how low I wanted it.

If you do not have a French curve, use a plate or bowl to create the neckline. I usually only mark one side, then move back up towards the neckline by seam allowance and cut this half only, and I use this as a template for the opposite side.

Fold at the centre and mark the second side. This gives a perfect shape either side.

Lay the new collar around the new neckline. Adjust the length so it will fit. I folded this one in half. It already had mesh so I left that there and placed that at the back.

Stitch the new collar on and over lock the edge.

Happy altering

Judith Turner a.k.a genie

Keep an eye on this blog for more hints, tips and ideas! We want to keep you buzzing with ideas, so not only will you hear from Judith, we will have some inspirational blogs to check out. This week, we suggest checking out Recycled Fashion (Hi Erica!), Sew it Again and I love to Op Shop. Have a great week, we can't wait to see your entries!

Monday, 13 April 2015

Refashion Tips: Adding lace to bodice

Last week we unveiled Castaway to Couture an an exciting, national refashioning competition, open to the public, ASG members & Red Cross people too! Castaway to Couture is brought to you by the Australian Sewing Guild Inc. in collaboration with Red Cross Shops. Entries open today, so we have our resident refashioning genie, Judith Turner here, with the seventh in a series of tips. Take it away Judith.........

This one is for all those well-endowed ladies out there.  I am a 16DD so finding a garment that is big enough to fit in the bust has always been an issue. 

Particularly since I am a size 16 bust but a 14 everywhere else.  That means altering almost all of the clothes that I buy.   

I found this really great negligee at a Red Cross Store and thought, “I love it”.  But I also knew it was not going to fit in the bust area (pic 1).


Also note that in photo 1 the dummy is closed at the front.  But in pic 2 I have opened the dummy to represent my bust size.  Once that was done, I pinned the lace to the negligee.  I used a scalloped stretch lace, and mitred at the front.  The straps had been folded and stitched, so I unpicked the stitching where I wanted to insert the lace, and it was just a matter of pushing the lace into the strap and closing it again.  Very simple and easy to do, because of the way the garment was constructed. 

Pic 3 shows the final alteration.  Whilst it was not a major alteration, sometimes it only takes just an insertion of lace of something to change it from plain to more elegant. 

Happy altering 
Judith Turner a.k.a genie 


Keep an eye on this blog for more hints, tips and ideas! We want to keep you buzzing with ideas, so not only will you hear from Judith, we will have some inspirational blogs to check out. This week, we suggest checking out Recycled Fashion (Hi Erica!), Sew it Again and I love to Op Shop. Have a great week, we can't wait to see your entries!

Tuesday, 7 April 2015

Refashion Tips: Shortening stretch or tee shirt fabric



Recently we unveiled Castaway to Couture an an exciting, national refashioning competition, open to the public, ASG members & Red Cross people too! Castaway to Couture is brought to you by the Australian Sewing Guild Inc. in collaboration with Red Cross Shops. Entries are open and we have our resident refashioning genie, Judith Turner here, with the sixth in a series of tips. Take it away Judith.........



So you have been rummaging through the Red Cross Stores and came across a really great

dress, but it is too long. AND on top of that it is a stretch fabric. How do you shorten a

stretch fabric dress without it puckering or damaging the fabric?


Well you create what I call an imitation cover stitch hem using your trusty old domestic

sewing machine. Yes it is true. All you need is a few tips on how to do this successfully.


1. Always use a Stretch 75/11 Schmetz needle. I have tried others and I am sorry to say

for them, that I always came back to the Schmetz and I always use a 75/11 Stretch for

all my stretch sewing.


2. If you have a single plastic button hole foot use that. The Janome have a clear plastic

one which is what I use. This is a small foot, not the one that you put the button in. If

your machine does not have one, try a Teflon foot. The metal foot will tend to DRAG

the fabric.


3. If at all possible, overlock the edge. DO NOT FOLD. This creates too much DRAG

on the machine. I would honestly suggest cutting it to the length you want, allow for

the hem allowance 2.5 cm (1 in) is sufficient, and take it to a clothing alteration shop

and ask them to overlock it for you. It might cost you $5 or $10 but will be worth it.

TIP – Ask them to ONLY USE ONE NEEDLE IN THE OVER LOCKER. And ask

them to move the only needle left into the left hand side position. And to only use

THREE THREADS.

Why? An overlocker can do four or more threads. But the fourth thread is a safety

stitch for when you are sewing Lycra or stretch fabric, as in making a garment. For

example if I was making a tee shirt, I would put four threads on the overlocker, and

hardly use my sewing machine as all. The fourth thread will stop the fabric from

stretching which means no give.


4. Use a quality thread – Guttermann or Rasant are the best.


SEWING

Turn the t-shirt inside out and iron up the hem allowance, measuring at intervals, so that you

have the exact 2.5 – 3cm (1 – 11/4in) all the way around and make sure you have the side

seams matching. DO NOT PIN – just iron.

It is possible to stitch the hem to give the same professional finish as the cover stitch without

using a cover stitch machine.

Some people use a twin-needle but it will pucker the fabric in between the stitches, and

creates a zig zag on the opposite side.

Make sure you have a Schmetz 75/11 stretch needle. Thread the machine with a matching

colour to the garment fabric and of a good quality; cheaper threads can cause tension

problems and thread or needle breakage. Set the machine to a stitch length of 3 or a medium

range stitch length.


Now we sew Topside (top right pic). To sew TOPSIDE, turn the garment right side out and place under the machine. By sewing ‘topside’ the overlocking has stabilised the stretch fabric and will stop the feed dogs dragging the fabric, causing it to twist.

Position the hem so the first row of stitching is through the MIDDLE of the overlocking on the opposite side.

Measure the width of the other twin stitching on the garment. There are usually two widths – narrow and medium. Narrow will mean positioning the foot on the edge of the first row of stitching. Medium will mean positioning the left hand side of the foot over the top of the stitching so it runs through the middle of the left arm of the foot (bottom right pic). TIP: Practice a few times on scraps of fabric to ensure the positioning of the first row of stitching is catching the overlocking.

Happy altering
Judith aka genie

Keep an eye on this blog for more hints, tips and ideas! We want to keep you buzzing with ideas, so not only will you hear from Judith, we will have some inspirational blogs to check out. This week, we suggest checking out Refashionista, So, Zo and The Pineneedle Collective. Have a great week, we can't wait to see your entries!